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The History of Black, Indigenous, and People of Color in Marblehead: A Legacy of Slavery, Soldiers, Speakers, and Secret Agents, Presented by Ginny von Reuden

January 30 @ 1:30 pm - 2:30 pm

The History of Black, Indigenous, and People of Color in Marblehead:
A Legacy of Slavery, Soldiers, Speakers, and Secret Agents
Presented by Ginny von Rueden
Sunday, January 30th, 1:30 pm
Meeting Room, Abbot Public Library and Online Via Zoom

To attend in person, please register in advance for this meeting here.
To attend via Zoom, please register in advance for this meeting here.

In a two-part series that represents a personal journey of discovery, Ginny von Rueden will discuss known facts, debunk old myths, and showcase new information about the history of black, indigenous, and people of color in Marblehead.

Who was Winepoykin and why is he so important to us today? Which Marblehead ship started the trade of indigenous and African enslaved people in Massachusetts? Who were the wealthy merchants and patriots who owned enslaved workers and where did they live? Which war hero led the first integrated regiment in U.S. history? Who was the real Joseph Brown? Where did America’s most famous speaker share his fiery anti-slavery sentiments? Which town Selectman risked his life and livelihood to harbor hundreds of enslaved fugitives? Archival eyewitness accounts of enslaved workers, black soldiers, and town leaders answer all these questions and more.

Join us in the exploration of this fascinating and dramatic story in Marblehead’s long history. 

Sunday, January 30th, 1:30 pm
Meeting Room (space limited) or online via Zoom

To attend in person, please register in advance for this meeting here.
To attend via Zoom, please register in advance for this meeting here.

Part One focuses on long years of enslavement of black, indigenous, and people of color in Marblehead and their participation in the Revolutionary cause that created a new nation. 

Sunday, February 6th, 1:30 pm
Meeting Room (space limited) or online via Zoom

To attend in person, please register in advance for this meeting here.
To attend via Zoom, please register in advance for this meeting here.

Part Two focuses on the abolitionists in Marblehead, the famous personalities who came to town to support the anti-slavery movement, and the dangerous work of the Underground Railroad.

Ginny von Rueden is an award-winning artist and interior designer who loves the scenic beauty and history of Marblehead. She is a former board member of the Marblehead Arts Association, Marblehead Museum, Marblehead Cultural Council, and the Marblehead-Grasse Twin Towns Committee. She is currently a board member of the Driftwood Garden Club which maintains the grounds and gardens of the Abbot Public Library, as well as other civic projects. Her life story reflects her specific interest in the lives and cultures of African people. von Rueden’s early childhood years were spent in Cameroon with her missionary parents. She served in the Peace Corps in Niger, traveled throughout Africa, and is co-founder of an ongoing partnership between Old North Church and a community in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa. While volunteering as a research assistant with the Marblehead Museum and the Marblehead Racial Justice Team, von Rueden learned that enslaved Africans were brought to Marblehead in the 17th century, a fact which ignited her desire to learn more about this topic.

This event is co-sponsored by the League of Women Voters of Marblehead, Marblehead Museum, Marblehead Racial Justice Team, Marblehead Ministerial Association, and Abbot Public Library.

Details

Date:
January 30
Time:
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
Event Category:

Organizer

Library Director

Venue

Meeting Room
235 Pleasant Street
Marblehead, 01945
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